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Curriculum and Course Sequence

A Bible course credit is required for each year a student attends CAK. It is an integral part of the Christian education. In every Bible course, students are expected to use the Bible as part of the curriculum.

Biblical Studies I - Old Testament (1 Credit) - Freshman Requirement

This class for 9th grade provides an overview of the story arc of the Bible. 

Biblical Studies II - New Testament (1 Credit)  Sophomore Requirement

This class for 10th grade provides a detailed overview of the New Testament. 

Capstone/Leadership - Junior Requirement - 1 semester/.5 credit

Biblical instruction, preparation and methods for Senior Capstone Project (Graduation Requirement)

Bible Junior and Senior Electives - 1 semester/.5 credit
 
Christian Ethics I
 
Christian Ethics II
 
C.S. Lewis
 
Disciplines of a Godly Man
 
Disciplines of a Godly Woman
 
Dual Enrollment BIB 222—Old Testament Lit (.5 Credit)

This course provides an analysis of the Old Testament as the foundation of the whole Bible. It focuses on the theological, literary, and historical dimensions of the Old Testament text and story; draws theological connections to Jesus and the New Testament; and makes application to modern Christianity, both corporate (church) and personal (spiritual growth).

Dual Enrollment BIB 224—New Testament Lit (.5 Credit)

This course provides an analysis of the New Testament as the culmination of the whole Bible. It focuses on the theological, literary, and historical dimensions of the New Testament text. It draws theological connections to major figures of the Old Testament and its biblical theological emphases. Moreover, it makes application to modern Christianity, both corporate (church) and personal (spiritual growth).

Intro to Missions (.5 Credit)

This course will explore the advent and development of missions throughout the history of the church. We will analyze biblical texts that emphasize and teach about having a missional mindset and will explore practical aspects of the missional experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description of Levels of English:
  • English (CP)--These courses work to solidify the students’ understanding and application of grammar, to develop students’ ability to write well-constructed, solid paragraphs and papers, and to engage students in both short and long readings designed to increase reading comprehension. The research paper process is taught thoroughly, with much of the work done under close supervision.
     
  • Honors English I and II--This level is designed to meet the needs of students working above grade level. This course assumes competence in the grammatical skills covered in earlier grades. It works with multi-paragraph writing for a variety of purposes (narrative, analytical, expository, opinion) and engages students in both short and long readings designed to expand reading comprehension in a variety of genres. The research paper process is taught thoroughly but students choose separate topics and work independently both in class and at home.
     
  • AP English Language & Composition and AP English Literature & Composition--These courses are taught at the college level. Both 11th and 12th grade classes seek to prepare students for the national AP Exams given during May. The College Board Advanced Placement exam is available for those participating in these courses and the score received will determine if college credit will be awarded. Students are advised to check with the college they will be attending to see how/if these credits will transfer.
     
  • Dual Enrollment (DE)--These courses are also taught at the college level, but are not based on national standards or on the score of a final examination. Instead, curriculum content is based upon the standards of the awarding institution and credit is awarded based upon successful completion of the course. Students are advised to check with the college they will be attending to see how/if these credits will transfer.
English I (1 Credit)

This course works to solidify the students’ understanding and application of grammar, to develop students’ ability to write well-constructed, solid paragraphs and papers, and to engage students in both short and long readings designed to increase reading comprehension. Units of study will explore the classic elements within each piece, as well as discussion of literary devices including satire, bathos, alliteration, oxymoron, paradox, allegory, personification, and various methods of characterization. The research paper process is taught thoroughly, with much of the work done under close supervision.

Honors English I (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: 8th Grade English, Minimum test avg. of 90

This course is designed for the stronger college-bound student. The curriculum focuses more on advanced grammar skills, literary analysis, and creative, expository and analytical writing. Students are exposed to William Shakespeare through an in-depth study of Romeo and Juliet. Students are also exposed to a major study of Greek and Roman mythology and the impact of allusions from this literary genre in today’s literature. This class will move at a faster rate and involves higher level thinking skills than CP requires. The Coral Island is studied in this class and will be a required reading for a comparative essay in English II Honors.

English II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: English I

This course is a survey of World Literature that requires students to grow in all areas of the discipline. In this class, there is an emphasis on individual and self-initiated understanding and study of the subject. Students study and learn vocabulary words based on common Greek and Latin roots, practice and strengthen their skill in identifying and using correct grammar, and study and analyze a variety of works and genres with the help of various literary devices. By reading three major novels, a Shakespearean play, poetry, short stories, and various works of non-fiction, students learn to think about and respond critically to literature. Students are also introduced to the concepts of argument and rhetoric. They then use this rhetorical information to analyze the literature they read and to write the research paper. Students further develop and practice their composition skills by responding regularly to prompts in a writing notebook. This requires the use of personal narrative, creative writing, and expression of the student’s opinion.

Honors English II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite:

English I, Minimum yearly grade of 90 OR Honors English I, Minimum yearly grade of 85

This course has students study a variety of literary works by examining each work’s language, characters, actions, and theme. Students develop composition skills through the writing of personal narratives and creative assignments. Expository and persuasive writing are emphasized through research assignments and the analysis of literary works. The students read and analyze three major novels, one Shakespearean play, poetry, and various short stories.

English III (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: English I and II

English III surveys work produced by American authors ranging from Native American Creation Myths to contemporary authors. Students will complete two novel studies, a survey of short stories, and a wide variety of non-fiction readings. Emphasis is placed on historical and cultural relevance as well as identification and appreciation of literary elements. The course is both reading and writing intensive. Students will learn to write using a variety of rhetorical strategies within the context of both in-class (timed) and out-of-class essays. Long-term assignments, which are aimed at teaching the writing process and time management, include a persuasive research paper that allow students to learn, practice, and perfect key elements of the research process. The course also focuses on vocabulary and reading development as well as understanding how Biblical mandates and grace fit within the context of American Literature.

AP English III: Language and Composition (1 Credit)

Prerequisites:

  • English I Honors, Minimum yearly grade of 85, OR English I, Minimum yearly grade of 93
     
  • English II Honors, Minimum yearly grade of 85
     
  • Summer reading

The course follows the recommendations of the College Board for the AP Language and Composition Course. Readings focus on non-fiction, although some fiction and poetry are included. Writings focus on persuasion, including a persuasive research project. Writing instruction also focuses on rhetorical strategies for accomplishing specific purposes.

DE English III: College Writing (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: English I and II

This course focuses on the development of proficiency in writing through peer editing, revision, and instruction by the professor. Students will also learn basic elements of critical thinking through writing, with an application to living in the contemporary world. College credit is earned through Bryan College. First semester of College Writing coincides with Bryan College’s English 109 course, which students will complete numerous modes of composition, encounter essays written by renowned scholars and theologians about theistic worldview issues, and improve their confidence in reading, writing, and critical thinking. Second semester of College Writing coincides with Bryan College’s English 110 course, which students will complete academic research, complete numerous persuasive forms of composition, encounter essays written by renowned scholars and theologians about theistic worldview issues, and improve their reading, writing, and critical thinking.

English IV (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: English I, II, and III

This course is a history-based survey of British literature that is designed to prepare students for college-level reading, writing, and thinking. Students read two major novels, one Shakespearean play, various poetry, short stories, and selections from the Bible. Students write to analyze literature, to express personal opinion, to narrate and explain personal issues, and to respond critically to issues and questions. Students use their accumulated writing and research skills to write a researched biography. Students practice and improve their critical thinking skills by studying vocabulary based on roots and word histories, and by writing regularly in response to writing notebook prompts.

AP English IV: Literature and Composition (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: 

  • English I and II
     
  • AP English III, Minimum yearly grade of 85
     
  • Summer reading
     
  • Writing exercises for students who have not taken AP English III

The course follows the College Board recommendation for the AP Literature and Composition curriculum. Students read heavily and write extensively, both in class and out of class, focusing on novels, poetry, and drama. The research paper involves a close study of one author and his/her writings. Writing and vocabulary focus on literary analysis.

DE English IV: World Literature (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: English I, II, and III

This course surveys selections from masterpieces of world literature from the Classical period through the Renaissance which examines the works in relation to their cultural backgrounds. College credit is earned through Bryan College. First semester of World Literature coincides with Bryan College’s English 213 course, which students will gain a greater understanding of the topics, themes, and artistry of the representative literary works from a number of different languages and cultures. Second semester of World Literature coincides with Bryan College’s English 214 course, which students will attempt to gain greater understanding of the topics, themes, and artistry of the exemplary literary works. World Literature II includes literature originally written in languages other than English, though we will treat the works of some key English and American writers.

Each student is required to take at least two successive years of the same foreign language. CAK offers 4 years of both French and Spanish. Students are advised by school counselors to finish their study of foreign language in their senior year in order to be highly prepared for the further study of that language in college. Students are encouraged to plan wisely as the third and fourth year of a language involve much more commitment and conversational skill.

French I (1 Credit)

This is a beginning course in French language, which will include significant amounts of vocabulary, grammar, and culture. There is an overview of the places French is spoken around the world, but an emphasis on the country of France. The grammar consists of present, near future and one past tense of verbs, as well as articles, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions and many nouns. There will be an increasing amount of French spoken in class by both teacher and student with some orally graded presentations.

French II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: French I

Most of the first semester is a grammar review with the addition of new vocabulary and culture. Increasing oral and auditory ease is necessitated by class assignments. Verb tenses include: present tense, two past tenses, and future tense. Object pronouns are covered in-depth. The class is required to read an assigned book in French during the last quarter of this course in order to enhance vocabulary and review the grammar covered within the first two years.

Honors French III (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: French I, French II, Minimum yearly grade of 85

Advancing to French III represents a significant increase in the level of lingual proficiency required and expected. The class covers approximately 80% of the grammar that students are expected to know. There is also a dramatic increase in the amount of vocabulary that students are expected to retain. The study of French-speaking Cultures is more in-depth, giving students a vast exposure to many francophone areas of the world. The class is not taught totally in French but most of the testing is in French. Students will be expected to use more complicated grammar in written and oral reports while also demonstrating an advanced vocabulary. Students will be required to give several oral presentations, including a description of their religious beliefs.

Honors French IV (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: French I, II; French III, Minimum yearly grade of 80

For this class, a student needs to have expressed an excellent command of previous French material. This course covers some new grammar, but all previous grammar will be reviewed. Whereas in French III students may not yet “own” or show proficiency in using all of the grammar taught, in French IV, they need to show proficiency. The theme of the year is French history and literature, and a great amount of new vocabulary will be attained throughout the process of study. ALL class work is in target language. Students are expected to be able to effectively use all aspects of the language correctly in both written and oral work. Students take turns preparing and orally presenting a devotional each week. The final project requires students to prepare their own magazine in French.

Spanish I (1 Credit)

This course introduces the basic concepts that comprise the Spanish language and culture. In the beginning, introductory concepts such as colors, numbers, alphabet, and vocabulary are learned. The course incorporates the study of Spanish-speaking countries and people to explore the differences in customs and culture from that of our own. Each of the twelve chapters introduces new phrases, vocabulary, and grammatical concepts, which progresses the student to a higher understanding of the language. Biblical reasoning for learning a foreign language as well as learning biblical passages in Spanish are also emphasized.

Spanish II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Spanish I

This course introduces intermediate concepts involving Spanish language and culture. In the beginning, concepts that were learned during Spanish I are reviewed in order to refresh students’ memories of vocabulary and basic grammar. The curriculum then proceeds to introduce more complex grammatical concepts with an emphasis on integrating the learned grammar skills with spoken language. Special emphasis is given to Bible verse memorization in Spanish (and its corresponding English translation). This allows students to realize the opportunity of witnessing in Spanish. Each student will also develop a brief testimony, which they will translate into Spanish.

Honors Spanish III (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Spanish I, Spanish II, Minimum yearly grade of 85

Spanish III is designed to improve the student’s overall Spanish language skills. This course will have a specific emphasis on grammar, covering all of the verb tenses. The textbook highlights the culture of many countries through historical summaries, articles, and conversations. Students will be challenged in reading comprehension. The goal of reading assignments will be is to add vocabulary, improve grammar and writing skills, increase speaking ability (through class discussions on the material read), and to grow in cultural understanding. Attention is given to the peoples and cultures God has created so that we can be effective witnesses for Christ. Throughout the year students make journal entries, memorize and recite Bible verses, give small oral presentations, and complete one large oral and written presentation.

Honors Spanish IV (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Spanish I and II; Spanish III, Minimum yearly grade of 80

The Spanish IV course is designed for students who intend to study Spanish on the college level or aspire to use their acquired language skills for traveling, missions, careers, and more. Students are expected to have a firm grasp of all content and material covered in the prerequisite courses. This course has five objectives 1) to improve reading comprehension and be exposed to Latino/Spanish literature and art 2) to improve speaking and discussion skills 3) to vastly enhance vocabulary 4) to review and master grammar skills 5) to develop the ability to express faith in prayer, song, and devotions. Students are required to speak in Spanish in the classroom. Also, all work is written in Spanish, including reports and projects. Students will accomplish two major projects.

*Students must complete the required summer reading before the school year starts.

Color Guard: (Fall; .5 Credit)

A specialized part of the marching band, color guard members learn basic and advanced flag techniques and practice with the marching band for half-time shows and parades. This course fulfills the .5 PE credit that is required by some colleges and universities.

Lifetime Wellness (1 Credit)

This is a year-long course and is required for graduation. It is recommended to be taken during freshman year, but students may take it later if it causes a schedule conflict. The course is comprised of 50% physical activity that includes team and individual sports as well as conditioning and flexibility training. The other 50% of this course is taught in the classroom. There are a wide range of topics covered in the health portion of the course such as physical fitness, nutrition, first aid, depression, drug use, and alcohol abuse. This course does not fulfill the .5 PE credit.

Physical Education (.5 Credit; Pass/Fail)

This is a one-semester physical education course with an emphasis on cardiovascular fitness. It will include callisthenic exercises, aerobic conditioning, weight training, and walking. The purpose of this course is to emphasize the skills necessary to maintain lifetime fitness. This course fulfills the .5 PE credit. Participation in a full season of any approved CAK sport may be substituted for the PE credit.

Weight Training (.5 Credit; Pass/Fail)

Weight training class is an opportunity for beginners and experienced lifters to work on specific areas for strength and flexibility. This course fulfills the .5 credit PE that is required by some colleges and universities. Participation in a full season of any approved CAK sport may be substituted for the PE credit.

Algebra I (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra (8th grade)

This course is designed to build on the foundations presented in pre-algebra. It is important to have a firm grasp of those concepts. However, some time is spent reviewing fractions, decimals and percentages. Students learn to apply the concepts they learn to real world problems through problem solving of real-life situations. Students also learn to use appropriate algebraic terminology and communicate in a technical manner. The three major concepts taught during the year are solving single and multiple variable problems, coordinate and plane graphing, and the factoring of quadratic equations. Other topics include expressing verbal expressions, statistical applications, algebraic properties of real numbers, functions, application of formulas, geometric applications, proportions, business applications, and solving radical expressions. The calculator is used for some types of problems (square roots, for example). Otherwise, students are urged not to use them for arithmetic calculations. There is some instruction on using the higher functions of the calculator for exposure prior to taking higher-level math classes. The course also works on PSAT, SAT and ACT preparation.

Algebra II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Algebra I

The course reviews and deepens the understanding of basic algebraic concepts learned in Algebra I. New emphasis is placed on conic sections, polynomial functions, and exponential and logarithmic function. Theoretical and practical concepts will be explored.

Honors Algebra II (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Algebra I with a minimum quarter grade of 88

This course covers all of Algebra 2 CP concepts. In addition, more theoretical applications as well as additional word problems are required. Additional homework is assigned and testing is more rigorous.

Algebra III/Trigonometry (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Algebra I and II; Geometry

This course is an introduction to the area of advanced mathematics and contains some of the topics covered in Pre-Calculus. The purpose of this course is to further develop mathematical skills already attained and to prepare students for college mathematics while introducing trigonometry. Topics include coordinate geometry, inequalities, functions, circle and triangle trigonometry, trigonometric equations, logarithms, probability, and statistics.

AP Calculus AB (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Algebra I and II; Geometry

Pre-Calculus with a minimum quarter grade of 88 OR Honors Pre-Calculus with a minimum quarter grade of 85

This course is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of Calculus concepts and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multifaceted approach with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. The broad topics of functions, graphs, limits, derivatives and integrals are covered. The curriculum coincides with a first semester college-level Calculus course.

AP Calculus BC (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: 

  • Algebra I and II; Geometry
     
  • Honors Pre-Calculus BC with a minimum quarter grade of 85
     
  • Remedial work if Honors Pre-calculus not completed

This class covers all of the material included in AP Calculus AB. Calculus BC covers additional topics within the categories listed as well as polynomial approximations and series. The curriculum for AP Calculus BC coincides with two semesters of college level Calculus.

Geometry (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Geometry is the branch of mathematics in which students study about points, lines, planes, triangles, and circles examining their properties and measurement. Finding the lengths, areas and volumes of geometric figures and shapes is very important to Geometry. Geometry teaches students how to develop ideas through logical reasoning rather than by exclusively using observation, description, and measurement.

Honors Geometry (1 Credit)

Prerequisite:

Algebra I with a minimum quarter grade of 88

Algebra I (if taken in 8th grade) with a minimum test average of 90

Honors Geometry covers the same topics as the CP level Geometry class; however, an additional emphasis is placed upon constructions and mathematical proofs. Students in Honors Geometry are expected to analyze more complex geometric figures by applying postulates and theorems.

Pre-Calculus (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Algebra I and II; Geometry

This is a course designed to prepare the student for more advanced work. Topics include: Linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. These concepts are applied in order to develop a student’s quantitative reasoning and problem-solving skills. Whenever possible, the student is asked to apply this mathematics to real-world problems.

Honors Pre-Calculus (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Algebra I and II; Geometry

CP Algebra II with a minimum quarter grade of 88, or Honors Algebra II with a minimum quarter grade of 85.

This is a course designed to prepare the student who plans to take AP Calculus AB. All of the course work for Pre-Calculus will be completed in this course. Additional instruction will be given in derivation of formulas, limits and sequences and series. More advanced problems will be given which require the student to apply this mathematics to real-world problems. Focus is placed upon thought provoking problems that prepare the student for studies in Calculus with less teaching time directed toward routine problems.

Honors Pre-Calculus BC (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: 

Algebra I and II; Geometry

Honors Alg II with a minimum quarter grade of 88; committed to take AP Calculus BC

This is a course designed to prepare the student who plans to take AP Calculus BC or college level Calculus. All of the course work for Pre-Calculus will be completed in this course. Additional instruction will be given in derivation of formulas, limits, sequences and series. More advanced problems will be given which require the student to apply this mathematics to real-world problems. Focus is placed upon thought provoking problems that prepare the student for studies in Calculus with less teaching time directed toward routine problems.

AP Statistics (1 Credit)

Prerequisites:

Algebra I

CP Algebra II with a minimum quarter grade of 88 OR Honors Algebra II with a minimum quarter grade of 85

Advanced Placement Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

 

 

 

 

Biology I (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science (8th Grade)

Through the duration of this class, the elements of Biology are explored; including the living world around the student and his/her interactions within the living world. Each of the following topics will be investigated: cells, interactions of organisms within their environment through different relationships, populations, biochemical processes, genetics, heredity, reproduction, diversity of organisms, biotechnology, and natural selection

Honors Biology I (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: 90% minimum test average in 8th grade science

This course focuses on the following topics: Cell interactions, photosynthesis, respiration, genetics, biotechnology, diversity, evolution, and creation. Students will learn through discussion, readings, labs, demonstrations, videos, and group activities. The course moves more quickly and covers more material than CP Biology I. Some additional outside reading is required.

AP Biology II (1 credit)
Prerequisites:
  • CP Biology I with a minimum yearly grade of 90 or Honors Biology I with a minimum yearly grade of 85
  • Chemistry I with a minimum yearly grade of 90

AP Biology is a rigorous course designed to allow students to test out of the first year of college biology. More than the learning of information is required; students must develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, be able to design and analyze data, learn laboratory techniques, and connect concepts across domains. This course is offered as a two-hour class. Two credits will be given: an AP Biology credit and an Honors Anatomy credit. Students who took Honors Anatomy separately the prior year will be required to attend until the anatomy portion of the course has begun (usually the last 9-weeks).

 
Chemistry IB (1 Credit)

Prerequisites:  Chemistry IA

This is the second half of a two-year college–prep course designed for students needing additional time on challenging topics, especially those requiring analytical and math skills. Students will further develop and build on material learned in Chemistry IA. Students taking this class need to take a science each year of high school. *For a list of topics, see Chemistry course description.

Chemistry I (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • Biology and Algebra I with a minimum yearly grades of 75%
  • Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Chemistry is the systematic study of matter and energy as they relate to chemical change. Topics covered include:

Properties and changes of matter, scientific measurements and problem solving, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties and behavior of gases, solids, and liquids, solutions, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and polymers. Students will develop problem-solving skills as they use algebra to analyze chemical processes. The course emphasizes laboratory experience, both through student experiments and teacher demonstrations.

Honors Chemistry I (1 Credit)
Honors Chemistry II (1 Credit)
 
AP Chemistry II (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • Algebra II with a minimum quarter grade of 93 OR Honors Algebra II with a Minimum quarter grade of 88
  • Chemistry I with a minimum exam grade of 90

AP Chemistry II reinforces many of the skills and concepts introduced in Chemistry I, although in much greater detail. Many new concepts are introduced as students gain a more comprehensive understanding of the principles governing matter and energy. Emphasis is placed on the development of independent thinking, problem solving, and integration of chemical processes. Labs are performed approximately once a week. In addition to mastery of concepts introduced in Chemistry I, new topics include: Thermochemistry, Kinetics, Entropy, Chemical equilibrium, Organic Chemistry, and Electrochemistry

Environmental Science (1 Credit)

This course is a study of how living things interact and depend upon other living things and their surroundings. This involves basic concepts from Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science and Meteorology. With an understanding of these concepts, we study the effects that human activities can have on the environment. A foundation of the course is to see God as the Creator of the environment and then understand our Christian responsibilities to Him for maintaining and protecting the environment. The objective is to help prepare Christian adults to make decisions on issues affecting the environment so that their decisions are based on sound knowledge and scriptural values.

Human Anatomy & Physiology (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Biology I

Physiology is a branch of biological science that explores the physical and chemical processes of the human body. In this course, the student will study the major structures and functions of the body systems, and they will be provided with the knowledge and prerequisite skills needed for daily living and ethical decision making.

Honors Human Anatomy & Physiology (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • Biology I with a minimum yearly grade of 93 OR Honors Biology I with a minimum yearly grade of 85
  • Chemistry I with a minimum yearly grade of 75

This course is designed to explore the structure and function of the human body, but includes anatomy of other species as well. Systems of the body will outline the course, with much attention to form and function, discussion of evolutionary slant, and other topics of interest in comparative anatomy. Students taking AP Biology will receive Honors Anatomy credit as a part of the AP Biology 2-hour course (and so should not sign up for this class separately).

Physics (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • Chemistry I with a minimum yearly grade of 75
  • Algebra II with a minimum yearly grade of 75
  • Geometry with a minimum yearly grade of 75

The curriculum is based on a study of classical physics. Classical physics includes the disciplines of: Classical (Newtonian) mechanics (including vectors, motion, force, work and energy); Waves (sound and light); Electromagnetism; and Thermodynamics. Since the disciplines of mechanics and electromagnetism, including waves and optics, are fundamental to all areas of physics, the emphasis of this course will be in these areas. Thermodynamics is covered as time permits. The course is structured to provide the students with an understanding of basic concepts, to apply the concepts through problem-solving, and to use hands-on labs to experience the effects of those concepts.

Honors Physics (1 Credit)
Prerequisite:
  • Chemistry I with a minimum yearly grade of 75
  • Pre-Calculus with a minimum yearly grade of 85 OR Honors Pre-Calculus with a minimum yearly grade of 80

The curriculum is intended to cover the basic concepts of both classical and modern physics. Classical physics includes the disciplines of: Classical (Newtonian) mechanics (including vectors, motion, force, work and energy); Wave theory; Optics; Electromagnetism; and Thermodynamics. Modern physics covers: The theory of relativity; Quantum mechanics; and Atomic structure. The course is structured to provide the students with an understanding of basic concepts, to apply the concepts through solving problems, and to use hands-on labs to demonstrate the effects of these concepts. The students will be required to analyze situations in homework and assessments that involve multiple concepts.

Zoology (1 Credit)
Prerequisite:
  • Biology I
  • Chemistry

The course will investigate the animal kingdom, primarily vertebrates and invertebrates. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function, including comparative systems of selected groups. Laboratory exercises include microscope observations and dissections to reinforce topics discussed in lecture.

Students are required to take a minimum of 3 courses in the area of Social Studies. Requirements are World History and Geography - 9th Grade, US History and Geography - 11th Grade, and Economics/Government - 12th Grade.  AP, Dual Enrollment, and Honors levels are available.

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AP European History (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • Honors World History and Geography with a minimum yearly grade of 85
  • CP English with a minimum yearly grade of 90 OR Honors English with a minimum yearly grade of 85
 

This course is typically a sophomore course but is open to other levels. AP European History is a college-level course that will encompass the study of European history since 1450 & will introduce students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express an understanding of history in a written format.

Government (.5 Credit)

In this course, the major emphasis is on defining government, the Constitution of the United States, and understanding the purpose and function of the three branches of government. The class also examines topics of interest such as current elections, court decisions and laws passed by the United States Congress.

AP Government (.5 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • CP US History with a minimum yearly grade of 85 OR AP US History with a minimum yearly grade of 80
  • Completion of summer readings and assignments

AP Government is an advanced study of the governmental/political systems of the United States. The purpose of this class is to gain insight into the nature of political systems, political processes, and political culture of the U.S.. Not only do students learn the basics of American national government, they also read and analyze multiple primary source documents that helped to shape the foundation of the U.S. government. The course is organized around the foundations of government, the Constitutional underpinnings of the United States, the powers and duties of the U.S. branches of government, political parties and beliefs, and public policy. The goal is for the student to understand the formation and working of the United States government in order to develop informed opinions of domestic and international political issues.

Economics (.5 Credit)

Economics is a one-semester course designed to give students an understanding of the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics and is designed to help students develop an analytical perspective of economics in the United States. It profiles various historical economic ideologies and writings. Students will be expected to analyze and interpret economic data relevant to the U.S. and global economy. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of the principles of economics. The class also includes an Internet Stock Market simulation in which students research and invest in stocks with their classmates.

Honors Macroeconomics (.5 Credit)
Prerequisite:
US History with a minimum yearly grade of 85 OR AP US History with a minimum yearly grade of 80
 

The purpose of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of an economic system as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed upon the study of national income and price-level determination. The course develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economics. The class also includes an Internet Stock Market game in which students research and invest in stock with their classmates.

Honors Microeconomics (.5 Credit)
Prerequisite:
US History and Geography with a minimum yearly grade of 85 OR AP US History with a minimum yearly grade of 80
 

The purpose of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of economics that apply to the functions of decision-makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.

U.S. History and Geography (1 Credit)

This course for juniors takes the first nine weeks to review with students on the early periods of American history that were covered during their eighth grade year. A priority of this course is to facilitate a mature understanding of the nation’s founding and early heritage, one that was based on Christian principles and religious freedom. After the first quarter the curriculum covers the time period after Reconstruction (1877) up to the present. Students develop, in particular, an understanding of American’s varied roles in world affairs, her belated efforts to assure quality of rights and opportunity to all Americans, her struggles and triumphs in a capitalist economy, and her ongoing commitment to interpret and apply the US Constitution in the lives of Americans.

AP U.S. History and Geography (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • CP English II with a minimum yearly grade of 93 OR Honors English II with a minimum yearly grade of 85
  • Honors World History and Geography and AP European History are strongly recommended
  • Completion of extensive summer class assignments and readings are required

Supplementing the college text used for the course are primary sources on the religious foundations for America, an overview text of historical analysis by a prominent American historian, two classic books of historical fiction, and numerous readings throughout the year of speeches, court cases, etc. Students will master American history from pre-exploration through the 1980s. While names, dates and events are the necessary foundation; the focus is on critical thinking about historical causes and consequences. Students will be expected to complete extensive document analysis and essay writing.

Dual Enrollment U.S. History (1 Credit)

This course for juniors covers the eve of colonization through the present. College credit is earned through Bryan College. First semester of DE U.S. History coincides with History 221 from Bryan College, which investigates the influence of geography in the historical development of the United States and covers the eve of colonization through Reconstruction. Second semester of DE U.S. History coincides with History 222 for Bryan College, which investigates the political, military, social, economic, and religious history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present.

World History and Geography (1 Credit)

This course is a freshman course but is open to other levels as needed. The course traces mankind’s progress from the early civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia through the Age of Exploration. Also examined are the various accomplishments of the Greeks and Romans, the development of the world’s greatest religions, the Middle Ages, and the forces leading civilization into the Modern Age. All the while, God’s providential hand is seen as time progresses through the centuries. Emphasis is also put on skills necessary for being a “historical detective” and understanding the differences that sometimes occur between secular history and Biblical history. Students learn why the knowledge of history is important and how God views the knowledge of history. The textbook, the Bible, maps, timelines, and technology are used to enhance the students’ understanding and perspective of the events, people, and cultures studied.

Honors World History and Geography (1 Credit)

8th grade Social Studies and 8th grade English with a minimum yearly grade of 85

This course is a freshman course and will serve as a prerequisite for Advanced Placement European History. This course will examine the same topics of CP World History and Geography and have additional study of the period leading civilization into as the development of modern Western Civilization during the 19th & 20th centuries. In addition to skills taught in CP World History, students will learn analytical skills necessary to discern the cause & effect relationships of historical events. There is an additional emphasis on reading comprehension and writing skills predatory to participation in an advanced placement course. Students learn why the knowledge of history is important and how God views the knowledge of history. The textbook, the Bible, maps, timelines, and technology are used to enhance the students’ understanding and perspective of the events, people, and cultures studied.

PERFORMING ART COURSES

 
Band-Concert Band (1 Credit)
Honors Band- Marching Band (1 Credit)

Students enrolled in honor band will be participating in both, marching band and concert band. This course fulfills a fine arts credit as well as the ½ credit PE requirement. Marching band will be the primary focus of the first half of the fall semester with Concert Band the primary focus of the Spring. Marching band rehearsals will occur during regular school hours with only 2 extended rehearsals during the week until 4:15PM. Marching band performs for varsity football games and parades as well as two marching competitions. Band Camp is required for CAK Warrior Band in the 3rd and 4th week of July. Camp ends with pre-season DCI/Six flags band retreat. Athletics will not interfere with the ability to participate in Honors Band. Additional information can be found on the CAK website.

Choir (Fall - .5 Credit)

This course introduces students to choral methods, emphasizing proper singing and breathing techniques, SATB singing, and an exposure to classical, sacred, secular, and seasonal choral literature. The culmination of the first semester's work is presented in concert at the Veteran's Day program, Grandparents' Day, the annual CAK Choral Holiday concert, and other (possible) performance venues.

Ensemble (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Admittance through audition

The “Spirit of Praise” Ensemble is an auditioned group of 9th-12th graders. The ensemble is instructed in a varied repertoire of music ranging from classic choral literature and spirituals to today’s contemporary music. This SATB group also works on mastering a cappella singing. The “Spirit of Praise” sings at school functions, for civic and church organizations, and at other events. This group has traveled throughout the Eastern United States, singing in Christian schools, churches, and nursing homes. They have performed in New York’s Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Walt Disney World, and The Children’s Village of the “Make-a-Wish Foundation” in Orlando, Florida, as well as internationally, to Romania in 2000. Auditions for the next school year are generally held in April/May.

Introduction to Theater (1 Credit)

Intro to theatre is a class that will teach students the basics of acting. We will perform monologs, skits/sketches, and possible a one act play. We will explore different genres of theatre and learn plenty of exercises to enhance our skills and grown in confidence.

Musical Theater (Spring - .5 Credit)

Prerequisites: Choir recommended; Audition required

A Broadway-style musical will be prepared and presented in April. Students will learn character interpretation, staging musical numbers with choreography, memorization of both speaking and singing parts, costuming, and make-up. Students may also choose to serve in technical positions. This process teaches working as a team, character building, and self-esteem in addition to the musical and drama aspects of the production. Practices will also be held at night throughout the spring semester.

Music Theory (.5 Credit)

Prerequisites:

Solid foundation in music (i.e. piano, guitar, band, or chorus)

Must be able to read standard music notation

This elective is open to any student interested in learning the principles of writing and analyzing music. It is designed primarily for the student who will study music in college. Students will learn elements of music theory including intervals, scale construction, harmony, part writing, ear training, analysis, etc. This course does not count toward the required 1 credit of Visual & Performing Arts for graduation.

Guitar I and II (Fall/Spring; .5 Credit per semester)

This is a one semester guitar instruction course. The instruction is focused on a contemporary style of guitar playing (developing skills used in playing worship songs, modern mainstream songs, etc.) This course is designed to take students from introductory level guitar ability (1st semester) through intermediate level proficiency (2nd semester), with the potential to progress to advanced levels depending on the starting ability of the student. Students are responsible to bring and maintain their own instrument. This course does not count toward the required 1 credit of Visual & Performing Arts for graduation.

Worship Team (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Interview; musical talent

The student interested in joining the High School Worship Team at CAK must be committed to living with a whole-hearted love for Jesus Christ and a desire to see His name glorified in this school. The worship team meets 3 days a week (the schedule varies between 0 period, 1st period and after school depending on student schedules). The majority of our time is spent practicing music and preparing for chapels, which occur once a week in the high school. Additionally, it is important for a worship leader to continually grow in his or her personal relationship with Christ; therefore, we will also use some of our meeting times to devote ourselves to prayer and Biblical reflection. This course does not count toward the required 1 credit of Visual & Performing Arts for graduation.

VISUAL ART COURSES

 
General Art I (1 Credit)

The general art course is an introduction to the elements and techniques of art and principles of design. This course is designed to help students learn as they complete various studio projects, while learning to appreciate art history. Drawing skills are learned and improved upon as an introduction to learning the keen sense of observation. These skills will then become the foundation for painting, printmaking, collage, pastels, etc.

Honors Art II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: General Art I

The class builds upon the general art course. The students critically evaluate art. There will be an emphasis on projects and an expectation of a well-developed and advanced skill level. This course will be a prerequisite for the Advanced Placement Studio Art Class. Honors Art may be repeated since studio projects will change each year.

Photography (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Art-General

Photography is a year-long course with a concentration on the fine arts aspect of photography. Students will learn the history of photography, the meanings of terms such as aperture, megapixel, and shutter speed, and how to file and enhance photographs on the computer. An introduction to Photoshop is included. Students will have weekly projects to complete outside of class, and will critique photos during the class period. The entire class will take a fall field trip to the downtown area and a spring field trip to the Knoxville Zoo. Professional photographers will come speak to the class. The final project is a book created with the photographs taken through the year. A digital camera is required.

Advanced Photography (1 Credit)

Prerequisites: Art-General; Photography

This course will be more project-oriented, with students completing more thorough investigation of a topic. Students will concentrate on photo composition, correct lighting, and creativity. Students will also increase their knowledge of Photoshop on the computer. Professional photographers from the area will speak to the class on their profession as well as show examples of their work. Classes will take a fall and a spring field trip, as well as create a book of their best photography at the end of the year. A digital camera is required.

AP Studio Art (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Advanced Art; The completion of summer assignments

AP Studio Art is a course in which each student builds a portfolio that will be submitted to the AP program in May. Throughout the year students will produce artwork to be photographed for the digital part of the portfolio, and will prepare 5 pieces that will be sent in the portfolio. Students may use artwork created in previous years, as long as it resembles the quality required of the AP Portfolio. The College Board will score the portfolio in conjunction with the digital images, and then send it back to the student’s home address in July.

App Development (.5 Credit)

Did you ever wonder where your apps come from? App Development will learn the fundamentals if making an app. Some computer languages will be used for building our own apps.

Business Principles (1 Credit)

This course introduces students to all aspects of business which includes the international economy, use of credit, ethical behavior, finance principles, management strategies, information systems, marketing, leadership styles, and human resource management. Students will analyze the elements of the business environment and focus on the decision-making and problem-solving skills inherent to operating a business.

Computer Applications (.5 Credit)

Computer Applications is a fundamental course in the Computer/Media curriculum at CAK. Students will learn the basics of computer information systems and navigating on the computer. Although an emphasis is placed on learning Microsoft Office products, the skills that the student will learn are applicable to all programs. In the ever-changing world of technology, students must most importantly learn how to learn new things and apply them.

Computer Science I

 

AP Computer Science (1 Credit)
Prerequisite:
  • Computer Applications
  • Coding experience is recommended

In this course, students will first learn the tools of programming and the basic building blocks of computer science with topics including: control structures, primitive and class data types such as arrays, ArrayList and Strings, methods, and recursion. Students will then learn how to manipulate data to create more sophisticated programs with topics including class design, algorithm development, and user-defined data types. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to take the AP Computer Science Exam.

Graphic Design (1 credit)

Graphic Design introduces the fundamentals of design and graphics. This is a basic course with an emphasis on communication through use of concepts, type and images. The course includes development of layout skills, style and an introduction to logotype design. The computer is demonstrated as a graphic design tool. Students will learn a variety of programs used to create images on the computer.

Warrior News Broadcasting & Video Production (1 Credit)

Students in this class will plan, develop, write, and produce live broadcasts of CAK sports and non-sports events campus wide. CAK will partner with Scripps Broadcasting to include instruction in production, interviewing, lighting, sound and video editing techniques. Student roles will vary and may include on air live commentators, technical assistants, scriptwriters, video editors, sound mixers and additional roles as needed.

Web Design (.5 Credit)

Web Design studies the use of the Internet and how to design pages for the web. Basic mark-up languages and code will be thoroughly practiced. Students will also learn how to add different types of media to their websites. Students will strive to add style to their websites and make them more functional. With experience, the students will be able to use the Internet as a useful tool in God’s kingdom.

Civil Law (Fall, .5 Credit)

This course is offered every other year, alternating with criminal law, and focuses on the litigation facet of the law. Students will learn basic pre-trial and trial litigation, as well as develop strong debate and oral argument skills. Students will participate in mock-trial experiences, go on a field trip (ex. the University of Tennessee-School of Law), and will gain insight into the preparation required to become a member of the Bar and to practice law in Tennessee.

Creative Writing (Fall; .5 Credit)

Creative writing is a semester-long class focusing on writing imaginatively across three genres: fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. The course provides opportunities for students to practice writing as a craft, refining their creative writing skills and abilities beyond those developed in the required English courses. This course encourages students to see creative writing as a unique way of thinking, and as a means of constructing and conveying meaning through imagery, careful detail, and a critical look at the work of professional writers. The overall goal is to produce better readers and better writers. This course is an English elective and does not fulfill the English requirements for graduation.

Criminal Law (Spring, .5 Credit)

Criminal law is the legal field that deals with the laws created by the U.S. and individual states which criminalize certain behaviors. It also concerns the processes and rules in the investigation, arrest, prosecution, sentencing, and appeals of the criminal defendant. Through the use of classroom discussion, case studies, legal application, debates, and mock trial, the student will have a better understanding of how the law works and what rights each citizen holds. As part of the course, students will take a field trip to a local courthouse and observe the criminal justice system in action.

Contemporary Issues
 
Driver’s Education - by Drive Rite

Student must be at least 15 years of age at the beginning of the course and a fee for the class

A course of instruction in driving that covers the mental, physical, and emotional skills necessary to operate a motor vehicle in a safe manner. The course includes a minimum of 30 hours of classroom instruction and 6 hours of behind the wheel experience. The student will take their DMV driver’s test at their completion of 6 hours of behind the wheel instruction. This certification will be valid for 365 days.

***This course does not count toward the elective credit(s) required for graduation***

Film in American Culture (1 Credit)

This course is a Social Studies elective that will critically examine how mainstream movies have both reflected and influenced American culture over the previous century. Students will focus on the various worldviews presented and how those worldviews have evolved over time. This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

Journalism (1 Credit)

In this year-long course, journalism students will work together with yearbook students for the High School. The focus will be on writing articles and captions for the yearbook.

Psychology (.5 Credit)

This course introduces upperclassmen students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated within each of the sub-fields of psychology. Topics discussed include: Research methods; Physiological foundations of behavior; Growth and development; Learning and memory; Motivation and emotions; Personality; Stress and adjustment; Social interactions; Psychological disorders; Treatment approaches.

AP Psychology (1 Credit)
Prerequisites:
  • World History with a minimum yearly grade of 85
  • AP European History or AP US History is strongly recommended

This course will introduce upperclassmen students to the studies of behavior and mental processes of humans and animals. Students will be provided with a critical overview of the study of psychology, focusing on the theories and research methods used in psychological science and practice. Because psychology is a fascinating course, it is possible to explore the field using a variety of methods. The course information will be presented through lectures, class participation activities, demonstrations, online resources, and audio-visual aids. Students will use the textbooks and other resources such as the internet, popular media, newspapers, and professional Psychological publications in order to conduct research throughout the year. Students will learn about the methods and ethical approaches of professional Psychology.

Sociology (.5 Credit)

Sociology is a course designed to investigate the principles of Sociology, the role of the individual within groups, social institutions, social control, and the use of research methods to examine social problems. The course provides practice to students in developing critical thinking, decision-making, and social skills concerning human relationships. Students will develop an understanding and be able to apply sociological concepts and perspectives concerning human groups that include attention to socialization, culture, organization, stratification, and societies. Consideration of fundamental concepts and research methodology will also be given.

Speech (Spring; .5 Credit)

Speech is a skills-based class designed to expose students to a wide variety of both prepared and impromptu public speaking situations. Students will study and practice theoretical principles of communication models, techniques, and non-verbal applications. The course covers a variety of communication strategies ranging from a demonstration speech to formal debates and will even expose students to dramatic/humorous interpretations. Successful completion of this class will help students become: Aware of various forms and avenues for speaking; Critical readers, thinkers, writers, and thinkers; Well-rounded speakers who can engage in both prepared and impromptu speaking; More effective group members 

Teacher’s Aide (.5 Credit; Pass/Fail)

Teacher Aides’ have the opportunity to work with a teacher/staff person in either the elementary, middle school, or high school as a way to explore education as a career option. A student must be either a junior or senior to apply.

***This course does not count toward the elective credit(s) required for graduation***

Technology Aide (.5 Credit; Pass/Fail)

Tech Aides’ have the opportunity to work with the high school technology department to get hands-on experience with troubleshooting real-life software and hardware problems. A student must be either a junior or senior to apply.

***This course does not count toward the elective credit(s) required for graduation***

World Geography
 
Yearbook (1 Credit)
Prerequisite:
Yearbook Teacher Recommendation Required
 

This course coordinates a team to produce the high school yearbook. Students who possess skill and experience in writing, taking photographs, arranging layouts, and computers are encouraged to apply. This elective requires a capacity to work well with others and an interest in creating a yearbook that will positively represent the school.